Dr. Sarah Wobick-Segev

Sarah
Research Fellow

Sarah Wobick-Segev is a Minerva Postdoctoral Fellow at the Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of Homes away from Home: Jewish Belonging in Twentieth-Century Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg (Stanford University Press, 2018) and, together with Dr. Gideon Reuveni, co-editor of The Economy in Jewish History: New Perspectives on the Interrelationship between Ethnicity and Economic Life (Berghahn Books, 2011). She has recently published articles in Jewish Social Studies and German History. Presently, she is working on her second monograph, an investigation of several prominent Central European Jewish women who, through their work and writings, served as public producers of Judaism and Jewish religious culture.

 

Education:

2002-2010       University of Wisconsin-Madison                                      

PhD., History, May 2010

M.A., History, May 2004


2006-2008       Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Jerusalem, Israel)

Visiting Graduate Research Fellow


1996-2000       University of Toronto (Toronto, 

B.A. honours with High Distinction, History

 

 

Academic Appointments:

2017-2018       Minerva Postdoctoral Fellow, The Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

2016-2017       Postdoctoral Research Fellow, The Richard Koebner Minerva Center for German History, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

2014-2016       Limited-term (visiting) Assistant Professor and Director of Jewish Studies, Department of History, The University of Western Ontario

2012-2014       Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of History and the Center for Jewish studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

2010-2012       Postdoctoral Fellow, Judaic Studies, Syracuse University

 

 

Publications:

Books:

Homes Away from Home: Jewish Belonging in Twentieth-Century Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg (Stanford University Press, 2018).

The Economy in Jewish History: New Perspectives on the Interrelationship between Ethnicity and Economic Life edited by Gideon Reuveni and Sarah Wobick-Segev (Berghahn Books, 2011).

 

Articles:

“Negotiated Places: Making Jewish Space in post-war East Berlin.” German History 37:4 (2019).

“Looking for a Nice Jewish Girl... Personal Ads and the Creation of Jewish Families in Germany before and after the Shoah.” Jewish Social Studies 23:3 (2018).

“’The Religion We Plant in Their Hearts’: A Critical Exploration of the Religiosity of a German-Jewish Family at the Beginning of the Twentieth Century”, Jewish History 28:2 (2014): 159-185.

“Buying, Selling, Being, Drinking; Or, how the coffeehouse became a site for the consumption of new Jewish identities” in The Economy in Jewish History New Perspectives on the Interrelationship between Ethnicity and Economic Life edited by Gideon Reuveni and Sarah Wobick-Segev (Berghahn Books, 2011), 115-134.

“German-Jewish Spatial Cultures: Consuming and Refashioning Jewish Belonging in Berlin, 1890–1910”, in Jewish Longings and Belongings in Modern European Consumer Culture edited by Nils Roemer and Gideon Reuveni (Brill Publishers, 2010), 39-60.

“Une place pour l’amour? Le mariage juif à Paris et à Berlin dans une ère transitionnelle, 1890-1930” in Expériences croisées. Les juifs de France et d'Allemagne aux XIXe et XXe siècles edited by Heidi Knörzer (Éditions de l’éclat, 2010), 178-207.

“Interdit de café. L’influence de la révolution de Juillet sur la condition des Juifs de Hambourg” in Les Cahiers du Judaïsme 26 (2009): 14-23.

Mädchenhandel between Antisemitism and Social Reform: Bertha Pappenheim and the Jüdischer Frauenbund,” in Sophie Journal (2005) (online publication: http://sophie.byu.edu/sophiejournal/index.html).

 

Reviews:

“Review of Philipp Lenhard, Volk oder Religion? Die Enstehung moderner jüdischer Ethnizität in Frankreich und Deutschland 1782-1848.” H-France Review Vol. 16 (June 2016), No. 89.

“A Strong Brew. Review of Liberles, Robert, Jews Welcome Coffee: Tradition and Innovation in Early Modern Germany.” H-Judaic, H-Net Reviews (July, 2013).

“Hofjuden und Kulturbürger (Review).” German History. 30(1): 2012.

“Kaffeeklatsch: Tales from the Central European Coffeehouse and beyond. Review of Torberg, Friedrich, Tante Jolesch: or, The Decline of the West in Anecdotes.” H-German, H-Net Reviews (March, 2009).

“Life in the Global Ghetto. Review of Laguerre, Michel S.,
Global Neighborhoods: Jewish Quarters in Paris, London, and Berlin.” H-German, H-Net Reviews (November, 2009).

 

Fellowships, Grants and Awards:

2016                Award of Excellence, For Excellence in Teaching in History, Western University, London, ON, Canada

2015                International Curriculum Fund Grant, for Project “Diasporas in Dialogue,” The University of Western Ontario

2012-2014       The Frances and Laurence Weinstein Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Modern European Jewish History in the Center for Jewish Studies and the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

2012                The Martin Buber Society of Fellows in the Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship (awarded but did not accept)

2010-2012       Postdoctoral teaching fellowship in Judaic Studies at Syracuse University (Jim Joseph Foundation and the Foundation for Jewish Culture)

2008-2009       George L. Mosse Wisconsin Distinguished Graduate 

2007-2008       Paul J. Schrag Fellowship in German Jewish
                        George L. Mosse Graduate Exchange Fellowship, University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

2006-2007       George L. Mosse Graduate Exchange Fellowship, University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
                         Mazursky Graduate Research Grant
                         Research fellowship at the Simon-Dubnow-Institut, University of Leipzig

2005-2006       Vilas Travel Fellowship for International Research Travel
                        Schrag Prize in German-Jewish History

2004-2005       George L. Mosse Distinguished Graduate Fellowship

2003-2004       Schrag Prize in German-Jewish History

2002-2003       George L. Mosse Distinguished Graduate Fellowship

 

Conferences and Presentations:

“Prayer and Practice in a Socialist State: Being Jewish in East Berlin, 1950s-1960s.” Presented at the “17th World Congress of Jewish Studies,” Jerusalem, Israel, August 6, 2017.

 

And you shall teach them to your children... or send them camping: Strategies for the ‘Rejudaization’ of children in post-war France, 1945-1950s.” Presented at “Child Survivors in the Immediate Post-War Period Workshop,” Jerusalem, Israel, July 5, 2017.

 

“Jewish ‘Thirdspace’ in East Germany from the late 1940s until the early 1960s.” Presented at “Spaces and Places in German Jewish Culture: An International Workshop,” Jerusalem, Israel, June 26, 2017.

 

“Serving a higher power: Spaces for Jewish religion and practice in East Germany in the 1950s and early 1960s.” Presented at workshop “Lived, perceived and conceived space,” Zikhron Ya’akov, Israel, May 29, 2017.

 

“Looking for a Nice Jewish Girl... Personal Ads and the Creation of Jewish Families in Germany during and after the Shoah, 1938-1953.” Presented at conference “The Holocaust and Its Aftermath from the Family Perspective,” Prague, Czech Republic, March 16, 2017.

 

“Having a Ball: Confronting Intermarriage in Paris and Berlin, 1890-1930.” Presented at the international workshop, “The Jewish Family Confronting Crisis in Modern Times (1800-2017): Divorce, Agunot and Inter-Marriage,” Akko, Israel, March 8, 2017.

 

“Diversity and the Individualized Jewish Community of Berlin, 1890-1930.” Presented at the conference “Navigating Diversity: Narratives, Politics & Practices,” Montreal, QC, Canada, April 13, 2016.

 

“Love is in the Air: The Role of New Places and Emotions in the Jewish Marriage Market in Berlin.” Invited lecture at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Koebner Center), Jerusalem, Israel, December 7, 2015.

 

“Finding a Way Home in a Modern-Day Nineveh: Friendship and Fraternity among Immigrant Jews in Berlin during and after World War I” presented at the German Studies Association Annual Conference, Washington, D.C. October 3, 2015.

 

Commentator for panel “The Corporality and Materiality of Emotions: Architecture, Body, and Language in the 20th-Century Imagination.” German Studies Association Annual Conference, Washington, D.C. October 2, 2015.

 

“How should we speak about the religion of ‘secular’ German Jews?” presented at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. April 25, 2013.

 

“Sites and Celebrations: Judaism and the Jews of Berlin after 1945” presented at the Association of Jewish Studies Annual Conference, Chicago. December 16, 2012.

 

“Leisure, selfhood and Jewish education: Sites of Sociability for Children and Youth” presented at conference The Experiences of Modern European Jews: National, Transnational and Comparative Perspectives, NYU. March 21-23, 2012.

 

“All fun and Games? Fostering Identity among Jewish Children in Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg, 1890s-1950s” presented at the Humanities Faculty Fellow Lecture Series, Syracuse University. February 23, 2012.

 

“German-Jewish Belonging: Community, Space and Faith, 1850-1950” presented at the “Second Junior Scholars Conference on the Future of German Jewish history” at the German Historical Institute, Washington DC. June 14-15, 2011.

 

“From the Mouths of Babes” presented at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. March 12, 2008.

 

“L’amour et le Mariage à Paris et à Berlin (1890-1910)” presented at the conference  “L’histoire des minorités juives d’Europe : une histoire comparable? Espaces publics et identités en France et en Allemagne” Institut historique allemand, Paris. December 7, 2007.

 

“Praying to Goethe, and other misadventures of three Jewish children in Breslau” presented at the conference “Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism and the Jews of East Central Europe” Central European University, Budapest. May 27-29, 2007.

 

“Consuming Jewish Life in Berlin” presented at the conference “Longings and Belongings in Modern European Consumer Culture” University College London. June 19-21, 2006.

 

“In their place: Jewish everyday life in Berlin, 1890-1970” presented at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Univeristät München. May 23, 2006.

 

“Consuming Jewish Culture in Berlin, Paris and St. Petersburg, 1890-1970” presented at the annual graduate student colloquium of the Simon Dubnow-Institut. March 30, 2006.

 

“Creating the Jewish Public: Nineteenth-Century Hamburg Coffeehouse Life” presented at the annual conference of the Association for Jewish Studies. December 19, 2005.

 

“The Hep! Hep! Riots and the Jewish Push into the Public Sphere” presented at the annual conference of the Midwest Jewish Studies Association. September 18-19, 2005.

 

“Buying, Selling, Being, Drinking; Or, how the coffeehouse became a site for the consumption of new Jewish identities”, presented at the conference “Jewish History encounters Economy”, the University of Wisconsin-Madison. April 15-16, 2005.

 

“The Place of Jews in the German Coffeehouse: early nineteenth-century encounters” presented at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate Student Forum: “Jews in the Eyes of Others”. March 9, 2005.

 

Courses Taught:

The University of Western Ontario

  • “The Holocaust”
  • “Jewish History from Abraham to the Modern Era”
  • “The Religion, History, and Culture of the Jewish People: An Introduction to Jewish Studies”
  • “Cities, Spaces and Minority Identities in Modern Europe: The Experiences of Jews and Muslims”
  • “Israel: People, Politics and Culture”

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison

  • “Jewish life in the age of secularization”
  • “Cities, Public Sphere and Minority Identities”
  • “Introduction to modern Jewish History”

 

Syracuse University

  • “Zionism and its Discontents”
  • “Contemporary Jewish Identity through Culture and Film”
  • “Jews in the City: Imagination and Reality”
  • “People of the Memoir: Jewish Narratives of the Self in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe”
  • “Introduction to modern European Jewish History”

 

Foreign Languages:

French, German, Hebrew, Russian (reading knowledge), Yiddish (reading knowledge)